CMMI and Agile Blog

January 30, 2017

Avoiding two common software project troubled paths by “being agile” rather than “doing agile”

This week I want to talk to you about two common troubled project paths, and give you some simple tips to avoid both.

The first troubled path is putting too much effort into documentation. When you catch your project heading down this path stop and ask:

What is the driving need behind our documentation requirement?

Often there are two driving needs. First, your customer or senior management may be looking for some kind of assurance that the software team is doing the right things.  The second reason is to help users and maintainers once the software is deployed.

Unfortunately, traditional documentation isn’t very good at meeting either of these needs. It isn’t good at helping users and software maintainers because often it isn’t trusted to be kept up to date after delivery.  And, historically, documentation hasn’t been very useful to software teams at helping them create high quality software.

The second common trouble path is reacting to the first troubled path by declaring “we’re agile!” –and throwing out the essentials for high quality software along with the documentation.

Now, today, it is a fact that we are seeing more and more organizations trying to increase agility, but many of these same organizations are struggling to figure out how to “become agile” without jeopardizing essentials for success.  And in a moment I am going to explain more what I mean by that phrase “become agile” because I may not mean what you think.

But first, a little background. You may know that in previous blogs and publications I have talked about Essence.  Essence is a framework that captures essentials for high quality software in a simple way—and most important to today’s topic—those essentials are independent of the degree of agility you are driving for with your teams. Essence also includes a simple language to express practices on top of the essentials to give guidance to your teams.

Today I want to talk to you about three simple parts of an Essence practice and how these parts can help your teams find their right level of agility while not jeopardizing essentials for success and help you avoid both common troubled paths.

Those three parts are:

  • the purpose–or goal– of the practice;
  • the activities conducted as part of the practice;
  • the work products produced.

Activities in an Essence practice are what people actually do when carrying out a practice.  They can vary greatly in prescriptiveness. In other words, you can provide activities in your practice that just specify “what” people must do or you can be much more prescriptive specifying in detail the “how to” side of your practice activities.  Similarly, the degree of detail specified in a work product can vary greatly.

Now, let’s look at some examples from my “Upside Down” book.

In Story Two in Part I of my book you learn about a team that came up with an innovative approach to achieve the goal of their sprint review practice when they learned a key stakeholder could not attend the meeting. They actual got on an airplane and went to the client’s site to engage that customer and get their feedback.

The point I want to emphasize here is that the real goal of the sprint review practice wasn’t holding a meeting called a sprint review which is what too many teams get overly focused on when they blindly zero-in on following specified “how to” activities in highly prescriptive practices.

Stated differently, what we are seeing too often is teams falling into just “going through the motions” of prescribed activities. Other authors have referred to this as the difference between “being agile” and “doing agile”.   And, to be honest, I really didn’t understand this difference until I observed it in one of my own client organizations.

What you learn from that story I just referred to is how a team stays focused on the real goal and figures out a creative way to achieve that goal which is gaining the buy-in of key stakeholders—not holding a meeting called a sprint review.

In that same story you learn about a challenge the team faces with a tester having difficulty communicating with developers.  In this case, the team came up with an improved testing practice that included the activity of developers placing a note in the ticket to the tester.  The note in a ticket could be viewed as an example of a very lite work product—not a heavy documentthat helped the communication problem.

In this story it is important to understand that the goal of the testing practice wasn’t to create a note in a ticket.   The real goal was improving communication between developers and a tester. Placing a note in a ticket was just one possible activity that could help the team achieve the real goal of the practice.  And in this story you learn how the team understood that in certain situations if it made more sense to just get up from their workstation and go over and talk directly to the tester that was an option they could and should use.  This is a perfect example of “being agile” rather than “doing agile”.

What you learn from these stories is that where teams often get in trouble is when they start confusing the activity they conduct as part of a practice, or the work product they produce with the goal.  One simple way to help yourself is to keep asking yourself are we are getting too much into “doing agile” –  or just going through the motions of our rituals, such as sprint reviews even when the key people can’t attend?

Or are we “being agile” by keeping focused on the real goal and coming up with innovative solutions when necessary, such as finding creative ways to engage our stakeholders when they can’t make it to our sprint reviews, and getting up from our workstations and walking over to talk to a tester when their might be some risk of misunderstanding.

One caution here, if you decide to allow more choices in your team’s practice activities by making them less prescriptive– it is also highly encouraged that you provide clear limits to the activities, and coaching in these limits, so the team does not fall into chaos.

Always keep in mind that activities and work products are important parts of a practice, but they should never be confused with the goal of a practice.

When we see this confusion starting to happen it is often a sign that an organization is falling too much into the “doing agile.”

Use these simple practice tips when you are developing your practices and coaching your teams, and you might just find it easier than you think to avoid both common troubled project paths and find your right level of “being agile.”

January 26, 2017

Is Upside Down the key to Moving Forward?

Last week I promised in my next video and blog to explain two specific ways projects often get into trouble and give you some simple tips related to Essence that can help mitigate the risk of both.  I have had a busy week and so I am putting off that video and blog, but it will still be coming soon!

This week I was interviewed by Bill Fox from Container13; Exploring Forward-Thinking Workplaces

https://container13.com/exploring-forward-thinking-workplaces/

Bill asked me some very interesting questions.  One thing I loved about this interview was that I was able to tie in a strategy that may seem “upside down” that is used by the coaches of the 2016 Little League Baseball World Series Champions from Endwell, NY– which is just 6 miles from where I live.

Check out the interview at

https://container13.com/is-upside-down-the-key/

I’ll try to get back on track soon!

January 15, 2017

A Key Value of Essence Related to Troubled Projects

I have been involved in the development of Essence since 2010 along with many other volunteers from around the world representing industry, academia and research.  And I have spoken on the subject of Essence at numerous universities and in many organizations including many of my own client organizations.  And the reaction I often get—to be frank—has been mixed.

Some people immediately see the potential value and react with comments like:

“Wow! I wish I knew about Essence when we were planning our last project.”

While others react with comments like:

“I don’t get it?” or

 “Why do we need it?” or

 “What’s so great about capturing what we’ve known for years?”

 Although it has taken me some time to figure it out, I now understand at least part of the reason why people react differently when first introduced to Essence.  The reason is because each person views Essence through the lens of their own experiences and perspective.  As an example, I can view my own clients as falling into two distinct types each with their own distinct experiences and perspective.

One type includes successful organizations with happy customers. These organizations have great people with proven track records of creating high quality software and meeting their cost, schedule and performance commitments within reasonable tolerances.  They come to me for coaching because they want to keep aware of the latest thinking and innovations in software development.  They do this because they know they have to keep getting better if they are to stay ahead of the competition.

The second type includes those who seek my coaching because their projects are in trouble.  Many in this group aren’t meeting their commitments and their customers aren’t happy and many don’t even know how they got into the mess they’re in.

Interestingly, it’s the first type who often respond when introduced to Essence with questions like,

“Why do we need it?” or

“What’s so great about capturing what we’ve known for years?”

 While the second type often respond with comments like,

 “I wish you were here and had told us about Essence when we were starting this project!”

When I help troubled projects I have found Essence to be an incredibly useful tool to help communicate to key organizational and project team leaders in a simple way where they went off course, and how to get back onto a healthy path.

This is a key value of Essence specifically related to troubled projects— it is a tool that can help you quickly pinpoint a problem area, and then drill down into that problem area, locating precisely what needs to be done, and then communicate the critical information to the people who need to know to get the project back on course.

I like to use a sports analogy to help explain this key value of Essence:

Most of us don’t appreciate a good referee in a well-played sporting event because we are focused on the game and the great performance of the players in the game.  But when the trouble starts, that is when the value of a good referee is recognized and appreciated by most of us.

What is interesting about this—and the parallel back to software– is that people who have only experienced successful software development efforts often don’t appreciate the value Essence can bring to– not only troubled projects– but to all projects, even the successful ones.  To help my successful clients understand this I like to ask them to think about the following:

Even though you are successful today, how confident are you that your next project will be as successful as your last?  And even for your current successful projects, how confident are you that the success you are currently experiencing will continue tomorrow?

 The point is that on all projects— successful or troubled—there is always risk of new circumstances and new challenges that can jeopardize future success.

 So what are you doing to mitigate that risk today?

While Essence clearly has proven itself in helping troubled projects today, its greatest value may actually lie in helping to mitigate the risk all software projects face of loss of essential software engineering activities that we now know exist and have captured in the simple Essence tool.

In my next video and blog I will explain two specific ways projects often get into trouble and a specific feature of Essence that can help mitigate the risk of both.

January 8, 2017

Helping Coaches Everywhere

In my last blog I highlighted how far a team can go to solve challenges on their own when given just a few simple principles and a clear goal.  But this doesn’t mean that teams don’t need coaching, tips, best practices and a structure that provides clear limits to how the team operates. This leads to the subject of this blog.

Besides the upside down principles, I also highlight in Part I of the book 18 coaching tips.  If you are wondering if a book that highlights coaching tips is for you, it is.  I believe everyone should view themselves as a coach.  But a big challenge most organizations face is how to communicate the right coaching tips to project personnel who need it, right when they need it.

Let me step back here, and tell you a little about my background.

I’ve been involved in the software business for over 40 years—the first 20 years as a software practitioner and the last 20 years as an independent consultant/coach.  And during the second half of my career as a coach I have often been called in to assist troubled projects.  One observation I have made about these troubled projects is that most of them fall into one or more of a surprisingly small set of common patterns.  But more importantly, when that pattern is detected in a timely manner, it’s usually not that difficult to steer the project back onto a healthy course. I’ve discussed this in previous writings and blogs. But this leads to an interesting question:

Wouldn’t it be great if there was an easy way to capture these common patterns and share them with coaches everywhere so more coaches could steer their project teams when needed keeping them on course?

This was my motivator for including a Part II in my book where I have framed the highlighted principles and coaching tips that have emerged from my stories in Part I within a framework called Essence.

If you have not heard of Essence yet, you have probably heard of the foundation from which it evolved, which I also explain in Part II of the book. I also explain with examples in Part II how Essence provides a simple and easy-to-use medium to communicate any organization’s practices, tips, principles, and checklists even among non-technical stakeholders.  This last point about stakeholders is particularly important. 

This is because when you read Part I you will learn how stakeholder issues related to understanding and knowing how to carry out project responsibilities is a repeating theme throughout many of my stories.  But, more importantly, it’s a repeating theme within many of those troubled projects I referred to.   

In my next Youtube and blog I share a personal story specifically related to troubled projects that can help you understand a key value of Essence that took me quite a while to fully comprehend and appreciate.

January 1, 2017

The Power of Principles

In my last blog I shared what motivated me to write my latest book, “It’s All Upside Down,” and I shared a little about what is in Part I of the book including some information about the 26 “upside down principles” (that aren’t really upside down).

In this blog I explain why I have chosen to focus on principles in the book rather than the more traditional approach of focusing on “best practices.”

So let me start this blog with a little background.

In 2015 I was fortunate to be invited to speak at the Agile Africa conference, and while attending the conference I listened to Kent Beck who gave a keynote address.  Kent talked about what he called policies – or what many of us might think of as principles–used at Facebook.

An example Kent referred to in his talk was “personal ownership”.  I found his talk fascinating.  The way Kent presented his material was by showing a single diagram with all of the principles visible.  He highlighted each principle he was about to talk about. Then he explained—using no extra slides, but just informally speaking– how the highlighted principle was implemented by practitioners at Facebook.

Listening to Kent using this presentation style gave me great insight into how work actually gets done at Facebook– and it struck me that he didn’t say anything about specific “best practices” used at Facebook.

This caused me to think about what the difference is between principles and practices.  This led me to the realization that principles are more closely aligned with goals, while practices focus more on approaches–or steps– to achieve a goal.

Now, please don’t jump to the wrong conclusion, or misunderstand what I am saying here.  Practices are certainly needed– especially for less experienced practitioners who need guidance in the steps to achieve a certain goal.  They are also needed for more experienced practitioners who often need reminders. However, there is a power in simply stated principles, along with a clear goal, that practices alone cannot provide.

For those who disagree, or challenge this assertion, I provide many examples in Part I of my book of the innovative activities teams come up with on their own to address their specific challenges.  And they do this with little help beyond having a clear goal and a few simple principles.

As an example, in Story Two of my book I share four specific examples of simple creative activities one of my clients came up with to solve specific challenges faced with regard to a stakeholder issue and a testing weakness the team knew existed.

Now, please understand that this is not to say that industry best practices cannot help teams with specific challenges.  But it is to say that best practices and lessons that were learned outside your organization can never replace listening to your teammates’ current specific challenges, brainstorming possible solutions to solve those challenges, and agreeing on specific courses of action.

Many might think that industry proven “best practices” would always trump whatever an individual team might come up with.  But my true stories demonstrate over and over again where this is often not the case.

Give your team a clear goal, and share some principles along with simple guidance in applying the principles, and you might just be surprised how far they can go to solving their challenges on their own.

I would also like to point out that I am not the first person to have observed the power principles.  Scott Ambler, one of the reviewers of my book, told me that with Disciplined Agile Delivery (DAD) they emphasize principles because people might actually read them and understand them.

In my next blog I will share with you a little bit about why I decided to include a Part II to my book, and what is in Part II.

December 27, 2016

What I’ve learned about software development and why it seems opposite to everything I was taught

In this blog I would like to share with you what motivated me to write my latest book, which is titled: “It’s All Upside Down”.  And I would like to tell you a little bit about what’s in Part I of the book.

So let’s start with the motivation. The title of this blog post is actually the subtitle of the book, which has a lot to do with my motivation for writing it.

In just the past few years I have made such drastic changes in how I help software development teams as a coach that it often appears what I am recommending to my clients is the complete opposite of many well established long held software engineering principles.

Now, in fact, my recommendations are not really in opposition to these principles at all—but they appear to be because what actually works in practice oftentimes isn’t what we think based on what many of us have been taught.

This was my major motivator for writing this book. I wanted to share true stories of what we have recently discovered really works for successful software development teams in practice.  There are eight stories in Part I of the book that all occurred in 2015 and 2016.

As I share the stories I also highlight 26—what I refer to as– “upside down” principles.  Now, the principles themselves are not really upside down.  What is really upside down is what many believe they need to do to effectively apply these principles.

To help communicate this message I focus each story around three key items:

  • First, the activities successful teams conduct in practice
  • Second, how much of these activities they conduct
  • And third, when they conduct each activity

 

I expect many readers will be surprised to learn how little time successful software development teams spend on certain activities that have traditionally received high focus, and–even  more importantly–  how much time is actually spent by successful teams on activities that traditionally have received little attention.

In closing this blog I would like to point out that I am certainly not the first person to have observed that what works best in practice often doesn’t match the theory.

It is also worth pointing out that this observation is not unique to software development. As the immortal New York Yankee baseball legend Yogi Berra once said:

“In theory there is no difference between theory and practice.  In practice there is.”

Now, in this blog I have referred to both principles and best practices.  In my next blog I will share with you why I focus more on principles in the book, and I will explain the power that principles can bring to a software development team’s performance.

Click to purchase the book

September 23, 2015

What’s the Difference Between a Practice and a Pattern and How do they each Improve Performance?

What’s in this Blog

In this blog I answer this question, as well as share status of work I am currently doing using the new Essence framework and patterns with two of my clients.

Blog

I recently started reading a great book titled The Pragmatic Programmer by Dave Thomas and Andrew Hunt and was pleasantly surprised to see a discussion on patterns. At a number of conferences I attended this year the subject of patterns and how they relate to practices was a common discussion topic.

So just what is the difference between a practice and a pattern and how do they each improve performance?

To help you understand let me step back and explain some activities I have been involved in over the past few months and how I am using Essence and patterns to help two of my clients improve their performance.

In June this year I talked at the Agile West Conference on the subject of patterns –http://conferences.techwell.com/archives/bscwest-2015/sme-profiles/paul-e-mcmahon.html, and I gave a workshop at Binghamton University –http://www.binghamton.edu/watson/industry/professional-development/programs/essence.html, on the topic of Essence, the new OMG standard (www.semat.org). I explained in my talk how Essence differs from other popular frameworks and how organizations can use it to help discover their own best patterns.   In August I gave a similar keynote address and workshop at Agile Africa.

As I explained in an interview at Agile Africa in August I have started referring to the patterns I am sharing as “thinking patterns” because they help practitioners make better decisions.

Thinking patterns differ from practices in that they set a specific context related to an organization’s current pain points. This is key to getting a discussion going in the organization related to where performance improvement is needed. Essence checklists can be used to help stimulate the discussion– not to tell the team what to do– but to get the team to decide what they should do to improve their performance given their specific situation.

What is great about Essence is that it is independent of any specific method so any team can use it. It doesn’t matter what practices an organization is currently using. It can help teams discover their own best patterns– and anti-patterns they need to avoid– leading to improved practices and better performance.

I have been involved in the software development business for forty-two years and I am only now finally discovering that we have spent a great deal of time defining processes (or practices) and the effort we have put into this activity has in too many cases failed to payback in real team performance improvement because they are not giving practitioners the real help they need to solve many of the challenges they face each day.

We still need processes, but processes help primarily when you are a beginner. Once you have moved past the beginner stage, practitioners often need more focused guidance related to the specific challenges they face each day.   This is where Essence and patterns can help.

As an example, I am finding that Essence is a really good framework to help organizations that want to become more agile to improve performance but are fearful that they might lose critical disciplined engineering processes as a result. This is a valid concern because a lot of companies when they jump to agile, miss essential fundamental engineering practices that they still need to conduct.

Essence provides the fundamental common ground that helps teams continually ask the right questions to ensure they are not losing essential engineering practices as they move their organization to a more effective way of working.

You may have heard the phrase; “With Essence your practices come alive,” and, “Essence practices are what practitioners really do, not what someone thinks they should do. “ I have been using Essence with one of my clients for the past few months to help them address specific pain points, and I am just now getting started using Essence with another client to help them rapidly improve their performance.

What I am learning is that patterns are a great vehicle to make your practices come alive in the eyes of practitioners because they provide concrete examples in how to think through real challenges leading to better decisions given your specific situation.

Over the coming months I am planning to share results from my two current projects and hopefully share successful case studies using Essence and thinking patterns together to improve performance.

January 19, 2015

New Video on Practical Ways Teams Can Use Essence and New Published Paper on Essence

A few weeks ago I shared a You Tube video providing highlights of Part I of a talk on Essence (44 minutes) I gave at Binghamton University in November, 2014 to a group of Computer Science students.  Highlights from Part II of that talk are now available where you can learn practical ways software teams can use Essence including games they can play to help assess where they are, how to conduct a root cause analysis to isolate a problem, and how to use patterns to improve their performance.

Highlights of the talk can be found at:

http://youtu.be/eosjm4NmFS8

The Part II highlights are 30 minutes in length and at the front of this video you can find where in the video the following 13 topics can be found:

  1. Assessment Poker
  2. Case Study Results Carnegie Mellon West
  3. Root Cause Analysis Example
  4. How Essence Differs from Lean Six Sigma
  5. Examples Using Activity Spaces
  6. Using Essence Competencies
  7. Another Example Using Activity Spaces
  8. Where Can Essence Help Most?
  9. Practice Slices and Patterns
  10.  Two types of information practitioners need
  11.  Examples of Patterns
  12.  A Closing Thought
  13.  How Students Are Using Essence at Binghamton University

I also have a new published paper on Essence titled,

A “Thinking Framework” to Power Software Development Team Performance, appearing in Crosstalk, The Journal of Defense Software Engineering in the Jan/Feb, 2015 edition.

http://www.crosstalkonline.org/storage/issue-archives/2015/201501/201501-McMahon.pdf

December 27, 2014

Essence: What’s New and Different?

In November of this year, 2014, I gave a talk on Essence at Binghamton University to a group of Computer Science students.  You can catch the highlights of Part I of the talk on YouTube.  This is a great video to watch if you want to learn what is new and different about Essence, the new software engineering Object Management Group (OMG) standard intended specifically for software practitioners.  If you don’t have time to watch the complete Part I– which is about 44 minutes– you can find a cross-reference at the end of the video to where in the video you can find the following 23 key topics:

http://youtu.be/uDELOAAFVlA

  1. What is Essence?
  2. The Difference Between Scrum and Essence.
  3. What Does Essence Contain?
  4. Why Did We Create the Strange Alpha Word?
  5. What is Different About Essence?
  6. The Essence CARD Deck.
  7. An Example Demonstrating How Essence is NOT Waterfall.
  8. A Question About Essence Versus Scrum.
  9. How Essence Can Power Whatever Approach Your Team is Already Using.
  10. About the Problem We Are Trying To Solve With Essence.
  11. How Does a Team Use the Essence Model?
  12. How Essence Checklists Are Different.
  13. How Do Teams Apply the Essence Checklists?
  14. On the Importance of Knowing When You Are Done.
  15. A Question on How a Team Can Fall Back.
  16. On the Order You Address States, and Decisions on Checklists that May Not Apply.
  17. An Example of a Team Deciding if a Checklist is Applicable to them.
  18. On Activity Spaces.
  19. Competencies Within Essence.
  20. How to Figure Out if You Have a Leadership or a Management Competency Issue.
  21. What if a Team Can’t Meet a Checklist Item?
  22. Why Isn’t Risk an Alpha?
  23. Why is Hardware included in the Definition of the Software System Alpha?

As always, your comments and feedback are encouraged.

November 27, 2014

Using Essence to Help Your Team Stay Fit, and Your Organization Find its Right Level of Governance

Some have raised the question:

Is the Essence Kernel (http://queue.acm.org/detail.cfm?id=2389616 ) just the essentials for all software endeavors? 

At a recent Essence user guide meeting this subject was discussed when Barry Myburgh raised the issue that some of the alpha state checklists might never be achieved by some teams.

He gave an example of a team with about ten developers he had been working with that never committed to when they would get the work done.  They had goals, but the team members had no idea if their goals were achievable.  He said they were incentivized to achieve the goals so as the deadline drew near the team worked hard, often late into the night, to get the job done.  When I listened to Barry describe his experience it resonated with my own experiences with many of my clients.

Examples of alpha state checklists teams might never achieve include:

Work Alpha, Under Control state:

  • Tasks are consistently completed on time and within estimates
  • Estimates are revised to reflect the team’s performance

Team Alpha, Performing state:

  • The team consistently meets its commitments
  • Wasted work, and the potential for wasted work are continuously eliminated

Some teams may never get to certain states such as Work Under Control because they don’t revise their estimates to reflect team performance. Rather they keep striving for goals that may be beyond their reach.   Ian Spence pointed out in our user guide meeting that some alpha state checklists are aspirational and are getting more at the health of an endeavor.  But when some people hear aspirational it can raise concerns.

Winifred Menezes, another Essence volunteer, pointed out one concern by asking—

What if a team is discussing their health and status and realize that they haven’t met a checklist item, wouldn’t there be a temptation to say, ”Oh, that item is only aspirational so we’re good and on track.”

Winifred raises a good point.  By calling some of the checklists aspirational are we making it easy for teams to decide these checklists are not essential and therefore require little attention?  Will this in fact dilute the value of the Essence framework as a guide to what is essential on all software endeavors? Will it cause organizations that are considering the adoption of Essence to lose confidence in Essence as an aid to help them find their right level of governance?

Toward the end of our user guide meeting Barry Myburgh after listening to the discussion said he had previously thought that on every software endeavor you needed to get through all of the alpha states because they were all essential to all software endeavors, but he now realized that was not the case.  Barry went on to draw an analogy.  He said when you use Essence it is like putting your team on a fitness program.  When a team uses Essence it brings an awareness of areas where they may have gotten out of shape, and can help motivate their team to improve in the future.

I personally like this analogy.  It reminds me of one of my Scrum clients who recently used a similar analogy by saying their team had gotten out of shape and they needed to go back to the gym.   They were doing this by giving the team some remedial training in best Scrum practices, and some additional coaching.  We heard a similar message from Cecile Peraire, another Essence volunteer, and a professor at Carnegie Mellon West where they have been conducting field studies using Essence with students.   In one of those studies a student indicated that using Essence Reflection Meetings reminded the team to think about points that otherwise would have been missed (http://works.bepress.com/cecile_peraire/31/).  Similarly, when I was writing my latest book (http://amzn.com/099045083X) I thought what I was describing were fundamentals that most teams followed, but then I realized what I was actually describing was what it means to develop a high performance capability.

The concern that some teams may dismiss checklists that are viewed as aspirational is a valid one.  A simple way to answer this concern is to point out that we all need coaches at times to help remind us of our responsibilities—and to remind us when it’s time to head back to gym– if we want to stay fit.  But this simple answer may sound too glib to some, and this reaction is understandable.

At a deeper level this subject is dealing with the more fundamental issues related to trust in a team to self-manage itself versus the need for organizational governance to ensure required practices are adhered to.  Part of what the SEMAT initiative is trying to address through the Essence framework relates to helping organizations find the right balance between these two critical needs, while also helping teams stay focused on the real goal.

I would like to hear your thoughts on this subject.

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