CMMI and Agile Blog

January 8, 2017

Helping Coaches Everywhere

In my last blog I highlighted how far a team can go to solve challenges on their own when given just a few simple principles and a clear goal.  But this doesn’t mean that teams don’t need coaching, tips, best practices and a structure that provides clear limits to how the team operates. This leads to the subject of this blog.

Besides the upside down principles, I also highlight in Part I of the book 18 coaching tips.  If you are wondering if a book that highlights coaching tips is for you, it is.  I believe everyone should view themselves as a coach.  But a big challenge most organizations face is how to communicate the right coaching tips to project personnel who need it, right when they need it.

Let me step back here, and tell you a little about my background.

I’ve been involved in the software business for over 40 years—the first 20 years as a software practitioner and the last 20 years as an independent consultant/coach.  And during the second half of my career as a coach I have often been called in to assist troubled projects.  One observation I have made about these troubled projects is that most of them fall into one or more of a surprisingly small set of common patterns.  But more importantly, when that pattern is detected in a timely manner, it’s usually not that difficult to steer the project back onto a healthy course. I’ve discussed this in previous writings and blogs. But this leads to an interesting question:

Wouldn’t it be great if there was an easy way to capture these common patterns and share them with coaches everywhere so more coaches could steer their project teams when needed keeping them on course?

This was my motivator for including a Part II in my book where I have framed the highlighted principles and coaching tips that have emerged from my stories in Part I within a framework called Essence.

If you have not heard of Essence yet, you have probably heard of the foundation from which it evolved, which I also explain in Part II of the book. I also explain with examples in Part II how Essence provides a simple and easy-to-use medium to communicate any organization’s practices, tips, principles, and checklists even among non-technical stakeholders.  This last point about stakeholders is particularly important. 

This is because when you read Part I you will learn how stakeholder issues related to understanding and knowing how to carry out project responsibilities is a repeating theme throughout many of my stories.  But, more importantly, it’s a repeating theme within many of those troubled projects I referred to.   

In my next Youtube and blog I share a personal story specifically related to troubled projects that can help you understand a key value of Essence that took me quite a while to fully comprehend and appreciate.

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