CMMI and Agile Blog

August 7, 2014

Three Great Book Titles and One That Missed the Mark—Part I

When I asked Bill Fox, author of “5 Minutes to Process Improvement Success” (http://5minutespisuccess.com/ ) what he thought of my current working title of my latest book he didn’t answer.  He just said, “the title of your book is so important.  I think you should write down 100 possible titles, then pick the top ten, and then poll your reviewers to get their opinion.” 

When he first suggested this I thought there was no way I could actually come up with 100 different possible titles, but within a couple of hours I had actually created a list of 102.  The next part of whittling the list down to a top ten took longer.  In my case the problem was compounded by a number of complicating factors. 

First, Peter Gordon, my publisher from Addison-Wesley for my second and third book told me that a title ideally should be no more than three words.  When I looked at my list of 102, less than 10 were three words or less and none of them were my favorites. 

Second, Rachelle Gardner, a literary agent says, an author needs to do everything possible to come up with the best possible title because your title “sets the tone, … and hints at the style of the book… and draws the reader in….” (http://www.rachellegardner.com/about-rachelle/).

While Rachelle’s advice makes sense to me, what really complicated this issue was the fact that I had multiple goals in writing this book, and there was no way I could capture them all in a single title.  Furthermore some of my reviewers were highlighting strengths of the book that weren’t even part of my original goals in writing it.

One of the lessons I have learned from writing this book is one should never be surprised if you don’t end up exactly where you set out to go when writing a book.  It is as much a learning process as it is a way to  communicate your ideas.  This is especially the case when you have over twenty reviewers many willing to help guide your thinking.  This also means you need to be open to hearing that the most valuable parts of your book may be different from what you had originally planned.    

My original working title for the book when I started it four years ago, “How to Get Better at Anything” never even made the list of 102.  And the working title I had for most of the second and third year of the book’s development as I wrote and rewrote draft after draft listening intently to my reviewer’s feedback, “Performance Improvement Simplified” made the top twenty, but missed the top ten. 

The top three titles eventually were:

  • The Essence of Improvement
  • 15 Fundamentals for Higher Performance in Software Development  
  • Better Decisions Through Better Practice With Patterns

In the last few months of developing the book a fourth candidate title was also added:

  • A Framework Vision for Higher Performance in Software Development 

In next week’s blog I will share which three titles could have been a great choice and why one of them turned out to miss the mark given where the book ended up.  I will also share which title was my favorite, and why the eventual winner was selected. 

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